Bocci Light – Designer Lamps For All Events.

Ceilings dotted with halogen lights might have illuminated rooms in the 1980s, but today’s focus is on Serge Mouille, whether it’s feature lights within a restaurant or table or standard lamps in homes. And instead of blind recipients, the lighting creates intriguing shadows on walls and ceilings.

“Lighting is now more dedicated to achieving certain tasks, whether it’s to create cooking easier, or simply to produce the right ambience,” says architect Jon Mikulic, director of Newline Design whose design skills include creating lights.

For your Dutchess restaurant, a great-dining venue in Melbourne, Mikulic created a striking light as a centrepiece. Set against a black-painted ceiling, the Coil Light is made of copper water pipes and powder-coated white. “There’s approximately 60 metres of piping in this particular design,” says Mikulic, who saw the free-form cloud-like light as a contrast to the more formal lines of your seating. Once the brief requires, lights enter into play, including cathedral-style glass lights for the nightclub that evoke stalactites present in a cave.

One lighting design that usually finds its distance to Newline’s bespoke homes may be the extruded fluorescent tubes that cantilever above island benches in kitchens. Wrapped in black steel, the 3.5-metre-long lights are pierced at various points to accentuate different qualities of light. In addition to fluorescent tubes, there’s also more incandescent lighting within this fixture.

“The brighter portion of this light is focused on cooking, whilst in another part it’s about creating a slightly softer light,” says Mikulic, who sees a move towards using technology to produce a more tactile response whether it’s placed into a domestic or commercial setting. “Lighting designers may also be starting to explore the use of a greater selection of materials, whether it’s ceramic, steel and even concrete,” he adds.

Lighting designer Suzie Stanford first stumbled on prominence together with her distinctive teacup lights. Made out of “up-cycled” fine bone china, these whimsical creations became a feature in commercial and residential settings. Stanford’s latest variety of lights, made out of found brass and by means of animals, fish and magnolias, enliven living and dining rooms and also adding light to bedside tables. “It’s about having the right form in each design, whether it’s a pheasant, a swan or perhaps eagle,” says Stanford, having designed a number of floor lamps and bedside tables just for this collection.

And also making a conversation piece for a room, Stanford’s lights provide intriguing silhouettes of creatures against walls and ceilings. ‘”I direct the light source upwards to generate more subtle shadows,” says Stanford, who sees lindsey adelman replica as a kind of theatre and as an easy way of engaging people, be they relaxing within an armchair or gathered around a dining table. And taking advantage of found, rather than bought, materials adds history to each and every design. “I really like the notion of reinterpreting an item. Before it could have been a copper bird gathering dust on someone’s shelf. Now it’s a centrepiece in someone’s home,” says Stanford, who sources her materials from around the world..

Lighting designer Christopher Boots also has established a reputation both in Australia and abroad for his bespoke lighting. His Prometheus light, a striking solid brass ring embedded 10dexmpky removable crystals, has turned into a feature in retail and domestic environments. Available in a variety of sizes with each one intended to order, the Prometheus lighting is now supplied to the us, Britain and Asia.”As being a child, I always enjoyed a fascination for crystals,” says Boots.

Also in Bocci Replica will be the Diamond Ring light, a considerably larger version of the diamond engagement ring. Created from solid quartz, these lights vary in size from 450 millimetres to 2.1 metres in diameter.

For Boots, the division between work and pleasure doesn’t exist. His passion for lighting extends 24/7, with constant exploration to generate lights that make people feel secure and comfy, whether being placed in their properties or dining within a restaurant. “A home should be a spot for dreaming,” says Boots, who couldn’t possibly have imagined seeing his lights show up in the Hermes shop windows, first in The Big Apple in 2014, then a year later in Vancouver.

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